All People Want to Feel Appreciated

The "A" in WUCA! means "Appreciate." You may NEVER get a second chance to tell a person what they mean to you. Take every opportunity to tell someone how much you Appreciate them and how much good they bring to others.

As the clock counts down another year, we often reflect and feel the need to make some personal changes. We want life to be fun and light, not held back by grudges, anger, hate. As the "A" in WUCA! is how to express Appreciation, one action you can take is to show gratitude and forgive others in a unique and lasting way.

To lighten your heart-load, try writing a living eulogy to three people: someone you appreciate (they might be gone soon), someone who has "done you wrong" (let it go), and yourself (you must love and appreciate yourself if you expect others to love and appreciate you).

1) A living person you appreciate. Let a living person know just what they mean to you while they can hear/read the words. You choose the delivery method, with the goal to touch their heart in a very Be WUCA! Way to feel their life matters, has value, and meaning. Do it now - you may never get a second chance to tell a person what they mean to you. 

My story with my daughter, Erin, is here, it is "Why" we teach how to build great relationships. 

http://www.bewuca.com/blog/my-why?rq=why 

2) A person who has "done you wrong." The point of this writing is to release your pain. Think about the experience/s you've had with this person and write honestly, from your heart, ways you can forgive or appreciate them. If you do this exercise, you know the circumstances and whether it's wise to deliver what you've written. If not advisable, write it out and store or destroy the document and feel good you've let go of feelings whose tight grip may have stifled you. Feel GREAT and allow yourself to move on.

3) Yourself. What's on your heart you need to jettison to go forward free of guilt, shame, remorse, sadness? You're an incredible person - think of how amazing you'll feel when you lift that weight!

But where to begin? Here are some tips.

  • Praise the person and their wonderful characteristics.
  • You could include a condensed life history, details about family, friends, work/career, interests, achievements, favorite memories, favorite poems, songs, quotes, or religious writings, and recall your own memories.
  • Organize notes and drafts on a computer, plain paper, note cards, video - whatever method is most comfortable and familiar to you.
  • You decide the tone. Some  prefer serious, while others may want to keep it light. A mix of both, solemnity and humor, is usually best to allow the receiver to share in the celebration of a life. Their life.
  • Write in your own voice - the same way you would normally talk. Don't get bogged down by the formalities - your reader will want to feel like you are talking to them from your heart, not a script.
  • Deliver in the best way for the person and situation. If you're writing for yourself, celebrate YOU!

The most touching and meaningful eulogies are written from the heart - it doesn't have to be perfect. Whatever you write will be appreciated. Writing a eulogy is truly an honor for a person - your words will paint a picture through the memories, anecdotes, and stories you tell of their impact on Earth. 

One day, the person you appreciate won't be there. Take your chance. Do it now!!

Global Horizons

On the Leading Edge of Thought

Building Civility Around the World

Who Packed Your Parachute?

Do you honor and appreciate others? Do you stop to thank and recognize the members of your team? Do you consistently show appreciation to others, have an attitude of gratitude?

The story of Charles Plumb is inspiring and emphasizes the value of each individual of a team. Captain Charles Plumb, a graduate of the Naval Academy, whose plane, after 74 successful combat missions over North Vietnam, was shot down. He parachuted to safety, but was captured, tortured and spent 2,103 days in a small box-like cell.

Plumb tells the story, in his book, “ I’m No Hero”, that other people are helping you get to where you want to be, even though you don’t realize they are there.

After surviving the ordeal, Captain Plumb received the Silver Star, Bronze Star, the Legion of Merit and two Purple Hearts, and returned to America and spoke to many groups about his experience and how it compared to the challenges of everyday life.

Shortly after coming home, Charlie and his wife were sitting in a restaurant. A man rose from a nearby table, walked over and said, "You're Plumb! You flew jet fighters in Vietnam from the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk. You were shot down!"

Surprised that he was recognized, Charlie responded, "How in the world did you know that?" The man replied, "I packed your parachute." Charlie looked up with surprise. The man pumped his hand, gave a thumbs-up, and said, "I guess it worked!"

Charlie stood to shake the man's hand, and assured him, "It most certainly did work. If it had not worked, I would not be here today."

Charlie could not sleep that night, thinking about the man. He wondered if he might have seen him and not even said, "Good morning, how are you?" He thought of the many hours the sailor had spent bending over a long wooden table in the bottom of the ship, carefully folding the silks and weaving the shrouds of each chute, each time holding in his hands the fate of someone he didn't know.

Plumb then began to realize that along with the physical parachute, he needed mental, emotional and spiritual parachutes. He had called on all these supports during his long and painful ordeal. Even though at the time, he did not know that he would need to call on what someone taught him, what parachute he was going to need at a specific time.

Who might be packing your parachute? Or better yet, are you packing parachutes for other people? Appreciate the opportunity to make someone’s life better.