All People Want to Feel Appreciated

The "A" in WUCA! means "Appreciate." You may NEVER get a second chance to tell a person what they mean to you. Take every opportunity to tell someone how much you Appreciate them and how much good they bring to others.

As the clock counts down another year, we often reflect and feel the need to make some personal changes. We want life to be fun and light, not held back by grudges, anger, hate. As the "A" in WUCA! is how to express Appreciation, one action you can take is to show gratitude and forgive others in a unique and lasting way.

To lighten your heart-load, try writing a living eulogy to three people: someone you appreciate (they might be gone soon), someone who has "done you wrong" (let it go), and yourself (you must love and appreciate yourself if you expect others to love and appreciate you).

1) A living person you appreciate. Let a living person know just what they mean to you while they can hear/read the words. You choose the delivery method, with the goal to touch their heart in a very Be WUCA! Way to feel their life matters, has value, and meaning. Do it now - you may never get a second chance to tell a person what they mean to you. 

My story with my daughter, Erin, is here, it is "Why" we teach how to build great relationships. 

http://www.bewuca.com/blog/my-why?rq=why 

2) A person who has "done you wrong." The point of this writing is to release your pain. Think about the experience/s you've had with this person and write honestly, from your heart, ways you can forgive or appreciate them. If you do this exercise, you know the circumstances and whether it's wise to deliver what you've written. If not advisable, write it out and store or destroy the document and feel good you've let go of feelings whose tight grip may have stifled you. Feel GREAT and allow yourself to move on.

3) Yourself. What's on your heart you need to jettison to go forward free of guilt, shame, remorse, sadness? You're an incredible person - think of how amazing you'll feel when you lift that weight!

But where to begin? Here are some tips.

  • Praise the person and their wonderful characteristics.
  • You could include a condensed life history, details about family, friends, work/career, interests, achievements, favorite memories, favorite poems, songs, quotes, or religious writings, and recall your own memories.
  • Organize notes and drafts on a computer, plain paper, note cards, video - whatever method is most comfortable and familiar to you.
  • You decide the tone. Some  prefer serious, while others may want to keep it light. A mix of both, solemnity and humor, is usually best to allow the receiver to share in the celebration of a life. Their life.
  • Write in your own voice - the same way you would normally talk. Don't get bogged down by the formalities - your reader will want to feel like you are talking to them from your heart, not a script.
  • Deliver in the best way for the person and situation. If you're writing for yourself, celebrate YOU!

The most touching and meaningful eulogies are written from the heart - it doesn't have to be perfect. Whatever you write will be appreciated. Writing a eulogy is truly an honor for a person - your words will paint a picture through the memories, anecdotes, and stories you tell of their impact on Earth. 

One day, the person you appreciate won't be there. Take your chance. Do it now!!

Global Horizons

On the Leading Edge of Thought

Building Civility Around the World

Spillers on the HiMama Podcast for Early Care and Education

Episode 64: Be "WUCA": Welcome, Understand, Comfort, Appreciate

Frank Spillers wants you to create a classroom environment where people (children, administrators, educators) can be engaged. "Be WUCA to yourself and the people you work with". Spillers works with different childcare providers to help them identify engagement techniques and helps them to be happy in the work they do. He often asks "Are you passionate about kids?" - if the answer is no, then Spillers says they're doing more damage to the sector than you are helping. When we have engaged people working with children, their impact is far reaching. "People will stay where they are appreciated and where they feel welcome".

 

The Preschool Podcast by HiMama

2017 Social Media Distribution

The Preschool Podcast is a platform for leaders in early childhood education to share their experiences, thoughts and insights in the world of early learning.  If you work in a daycare, child care or preschool setting, the show will provide you with practical advice on managing your organization, center or classroom, as well as thought provoking discussions about the field of early childhood education.  Our goal with The Preschool Podcast is to provide knowledge and inspiration for the leaders of tomorrow by engaging in conversation with the leaders of today!

Fund Early Care and Education for a Better Workforce

Why should businesses, communities, and states be concerned about creating family-friendly policies for their workforce and citizens?

  • Communities are concerned with keeping their youth and attracting young people and families to live, work, and play.
  • Communities across the country are pursuing the same families, so special attention is needed to stand above the rest.
  • U.S. companies lose $3 BILLION annually as a consequence of childcare-related absences and 85% of employers report providing childcare services improves employee recruitment. 

Here's how: inject money into making sure yours is a Be WUCA! family-friendly business and community with a quality, fully-funded early care and education environment. Every decision your community makes, asks: "how will this decision affect children?" Look at all your policies and ask if they are family-friendly. 

Issues with childcare often affect the job performance of working parents by increasing absenteeism, tardiness, turnover rates, recruitment, and training costs. In turn, these issues affect productivity and work quality and, ultimately, the competitiveness of the businesses that employ these workers.

An average business with 250 employees can save $75,000 per year in lost work time by subsidizing care for employees' sick children. Employers surveyed report that childcare services decrease employee absences by 20-30 percent and reduce turnover by 37-60 percent. If it's your own business, it impacts your bottom line.

Research shows that work-family benefits have a direct impact on employee recruitment and retention. For example, a small textile manufacturing company in the Southwest experienced a 40 percent turnover rate that dramatically dropped to seven percent after beginning a childcare program.

It's critical employers attract and retain good, productive workers to stay competitive in the market. Given the changing composition of America’s labor force and the impact childcare has on worker productivity, businesses with employer-assisted childcare implement a cost-effective way to control labor costs, enhance worker productivity, and engage your workforce. Employees will be loyal to and productive for a company who helps care for their children!

Investing when the brain is developing is good policy.

The following chart shows the relationship of brain development to public expenditures.

The brain develops 80% by the age of three and 90% by school age. In fact, the brain is connecting new neurons in the first 2000 days of a child's life at a rate of 700 connections per second. Every connection is a thought, belief, or a new learned experience. These first 2000 days are when school and work habits are being formed. We need to spend dollars when they will do the most good. 

Think back to your first thought. How old were you when you have your first memory? For most, our first memories average at three or four years old. As that is true, what is being taught to children during this critical phase of lifetime brain development is crucial to a child's - and society's - welfare.

But, as the diagram shows, public expenditures increase in the preschool and kindergarten years when a child begins school, near the end of early significant brain connections. In fact, the Federal Reserve has documented that for every $1 invested in early care and education, communities save between $4 - $14 in future costs of remedial and special education, the juvenile crime system, and welfare support.

The labor market today and into the foreseeable future is radically different than it used to be. New jobs that we will need have not even been thought of or invented. The old problem of finding enough work for rising numbers of workers is replaced by the new problem of locating enough workers to fill new jobs requiring technical skills generated by an expanding economy. 

Every experience we have had shapes who we are, including our school and work habits. Good early care and education is critical to the students and workers of the future. 

When you invest in and create a family-friendly WUCA! community with a quality, fully-funded early care and education environment, families will look for you and choose your community to call home.

When you implement these recommendations in your community and state, you will stand above the rest and grow! 

 How does this decision affect children? Is it FAMILY-FRIENDLY?

What Will You Become?

     Keep in mind this fact, only four percent of what you do is a conscious thought, which means 96 percent of your actions and your beliefs and what you do is subconscious because you have programmed yourself so well. How many communities, organizations, churches or workplaces are just like this! Just because someone has different thoughts or they look different, people automatically react to them in a negative way. 

     How many of you grew up and said, “I'm not going to be like my mother?” How many of you are just like your mother, as in this story? 

WE HAVE ALWAYS DONE IT THIS WAY!

      A mother and daughter were preparing a roast for a family dinner. The daughter cut the ends off of the roast before putting it in the roaster, just as she was taught. She asked her mother, “why do we cut the ends off of the roast before we cook it?” “I am not sure,” said the mother. “I guess it makes it taste better, but let’s go ask grandma.”

      So they went to ask Grandma. “Grandma?” asked the mother. “Why did you teach me to cut the ends off of the roast before cooking it?”

      "Because it makes the roast taste better,” responded Grandma. “Besides, that is the way my mother taught me. Let’s go ask her.”

      So the three of them went to the person who started the tradition of cutting of the ends off of the roast.

      “Great-Grandmother why do you cut the ends off of the roast before you cook it? Does it make the roast taste better?”

      “Heavens no,” said Great-Grandmother. “I cut the ends off of the end of the roast because that is the only way I could get it to fit into the pan I used.”

      Sometimes it’s helpful to look at the history of why we do things. Is it really necessary to continue some of the things we do or do we do them just because we are comfortable doing it that way? Do we do things just because we have always done it that way before.

      When you keep doing the things to get what you get, you keep getting the things you always got.

      You can change without improving, but you cannot improve without changing.

      Do you know anyone who has changed their life because of the intentional choices they’ve made contrary to their upbringing or circumstances?  On rare occasions, we see someone break out because of a certain talent they have, or they want their life to be different than how they grew up. They say, “Absolutely not!  I'm going to change my environment and I'm going to change the way I act to my environment. I’m outta here to find a new way to live!”

      Maybe it’s you. You want more. You want different than you are living. It takes conscious thought and commitment to change a view of the world. It requires constant, diligent, it’s-in-your-heart-and-gut passion to change.

      The biggest gap in growth is the gap between knowing and doing. In other words, you cannot grow if you do not do something toward growing. To discover the path in front of you, you have to start moving.

      Just as Martin Luther King said, "You don't have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step."

       

Global Horizons - On the Leading Edge of Thought

It Takes a Village to Engage a Workforce

America’s low level of employee engagement is a huge drag on your community’s economy.

An October, 2013 Gallup survey indicates that only 13 percent of employees worldwide are engaged at work, according to their 142-country study on the State of the Global Workplace. In other words, about one in eight workers -- roughly 180 million employees in the countries studied -- are psychologically committed to their jobs and likely to be making positive contributions to their organizations.  http://www.gallup.com/poll/165269/worldwide-employees-engaged-work.aspx. 

In the U.S. and Canada, that survey indicates employee engagement remains at 29 percent, static since Gallup’s 2006 survey of employees engaged in their workplaces.

In the 2013 report, Gallup states, “Increasing workplace engagement is vital to achieving sustainable growth for companies, communities, and countries --- and for putting the global economy back on track to a more prosperous and peaceful future.”  

These statistics matter to communities as global business relationships flourish and economies are increasingly interwoven. An engaged workforce is critical to each community infrastructure for safety, stability, and sustainable growth. An engaged workforce keeps vital services in place like police and fire departments to protect citizens and homes. An engaged workforce provides jobs and business opportunities. An engaged workforce provides volunteers for churches, civic, and philanthropic organizations.

If workforce engagement is such a huge issue for companies, and the statistic of engaged workers has been the same for nearly eight years, why is little being done to address the problem? Companies, communities, schools, and individuals must move in a different direction. Doing the same things in the same way will get you the same results. 

A picture of a village engaging a workforce

In a given geography, we identify four “workforce hubs:” individual, community, education, and business, each an entry point of opportunity to engage citizens. For example, in the business hub, engaged employees are critical for a company’s bottom line. An engaged worker will contribute more to profit, growth and innovation, increased investment and purchases by outside interests, and an internal productive, enjoyable environment. Workers need their “head in the game” while on the clock. When workers are distracted for any reason from the task at hand – making money for the business – worker productivity decreases. In short, worker engagement matters to the company bottom line. 

All businesses, community organizations and governments spend money to attract new opportunities and people from around the globe for economic growth. It’s imperative communities have a holistic approach to workforce engagement to be efficient with those dollars.

What to do? 

Implement an overall community approach with targeted actions to better-engage citizens in every hub to strengthen schools, increase productivity, build volunteerism, and reinforce families.

  • In the individual hub, get to know yourself. Coach citizens to know themselves and identify their skills. Find their passion and purpose, define their vision of the future, and establish goals to get there. In turn, the community will benefit from new businesses, stronger families, and increased pride. New voices, ideas, and attitudes that welcome must exist and be promoted.
  • In the community hub, be open to newcomers and new ways of seeing the world. Newcomers arrive in our towns in many forms seeking a place to connect, feel safe, perhaps raise their families, and contribute to society. In a five-county area, we used a process called Community Builders. By encouraging new ideas from residents and newcomers, 250 new jobs followed during the next three years. 
  • In the education hub, connect your students with your area workforce. The learning environment in your education system establishes habits for your future workforce participants. Schools are workplaces. Interactions between administrators and teachers and teachers with students need to model workplace etiquette and skills. 

In our method, Coaching in the Classroom, intentional outreach, especially with students “at-risk” is crucial to a community’s success. Gallup identified the reason students drop out of school and disengage from education: they have lost all hope in graduating. Our experience indicates these are the students who will run their community someday, so engaging them, teaching them early on to be productive citizens, business owners, and mayors will pay off. In one school district  that implemented Coaching in the Classroom, the “at-risk” population decreased in three years from 41 to 12 percent.

  • In the business hub, knowing employees and their strengths is key to success. When a worker is considered for a position, there is an effort made to connect their resume and skill set to what is needed. Likely what would be more effective, especially in the long-term, is to determine what the applicant is absolutely passionate about doing. Doing what they love to do and contribute will indicate whether they “have” to come to work, or “get” to come to work. When a person “gets” to come to work, a business will have an engaged, productive, energized workforce. 

In companies large and small, the relationship between supervisors and employees strongly impacts worker engagement. When there is worker dissatisfaction, it’s often with a supervisor, not the company itself. It pays in the long run for companies to train their front-line supervisors to have respected, encouraging relationships with the workers in their charge.

Gallup concludes, “If your business is like most, only about one-third of your employees are committed to your company’s success and that’s clearly not enough to overcome the two-thirds of your workforce standing in their way. So, while doubling engagement may seem like an uphill climb, it’s easier than justifying a company’s downhill slide.”

When you take a holistic approach to worker engagement, your whole community benefits by increasing wealth beyond the bottom line. People will volunteer. They will take pride in their town. They’ll invite their friends and family to move to the area, growing school districts. When you feel valued, you have personal and professional satisfaction and peaceful relationships - outcomes every community seeks in its quality of life.

Implement The BeWUCA! Way methods to motivate your village to engage your workforce. Click here now to create a 21st century workforce economy!