Stop the Drain - Stop Teaching Students to Work for Others

Save our schools and communities. Grow our economy. What are we to do?

The best way to accelerate our job creation rate is to embrace and support policies in all levels of the political spectrum that encourage entrepreneurs. We believe rural schools and communities can be saved and economies can grow by teaching young people they don’t have to work for a big company or for other people. Teach students that owning their own business is a great win-win strategy to grow the local economy! 

This isn't just a school’s issue. For rural towns and cities, it's an issue of community survival.

Our country is really run and dominated by small- and medium-sized businesses. Ninety-eight percent of your community’s new jobs are created by businesses you see on your Main Street, home- based businesses that are a part of your town’s hidden economy, and all your existing businesses you count on to meet your needs. Only 2% of all new jobs are created by companies recruited to your community.

For more than 30 years, I have worked with communities on many different levels, much of that time in very rural areas. I've watched communities spend many thousands of dollars to “steal” companies from other towns, creating a neutral net gain of jobs in the economy. Many of those companies, after they have used up their tax advantages from relocating, will look elsewhere to gain more tax advantages and their loyalty to that community ends as soon as they receive a better deal.

Our focus is teaching our young people from a very early age that an alternative of working for someone else is creating your own business and products.

The bottom line is that if we really want to make a difference in our economy and grow our towns, we should focus on entrepreneurship in our schools. 

Encourage people to dream and help talented individuals start companies that create business models that grow small-, medium-, big-sized, sustainable organizations. We need to encourage students to create local jobs by owning local businesses. And support them to grow regionally and globally.

We need entrepreneurship schools that give students alternative curriculum that teaches the components of business planning and use their youthful creativity to design the future.

Create curriculum that engages youth to develop as local leaders, energizes them through entrepreneurship and business growth, and teaches the importance of giving back through local charitable giving.

 We have a culture of taking inventions to market,. That takes an entrepreneur.

It appears to me that we have been losing that part of our creative business cycle. Many community businesses are third-generation owners, passed down in families, leading to many of our communities and leaders losing their entrepreneurial culture, innovation, and drive.

Entrepreneurs are those who usually start businesses, but another benefit of teaching entrepreneurship in school is teaching the concept of “intrapreneurship.” Intrapreneurs work inside companies and are the brains and energy behind creating customers.

An entrepreneur/intrapreneur will create business models that will identify more customers and create innovative ways to address commercial and social concerns.

Many of our towns are losing population. Schools are losing enrollment, and budgets are shrinking. We can turn around this trend by giving our youth an alternative to working for others and an alternative of having to move away to get a good job. That alternative is owning their own business and locating in the town where they are educated. Imagine a school in your town that incubates business ideas and business models that will spin out to locate on Main Street or can be run from a home using the community’s local technology, contributing to and growing your local tax base! You need to take responsibility in your community to create the environment for jobs to be created. Government can assist but cannot do it alone.

Gallup identified the reason students drop out of school and disengage in education, they have lost all hope in graduating. They cannot see how the education they are getting will lead them to where they want to go. Students will engage in their education when they see how it will provide them with a good job and a chance for a good life. For many, it is giving them hope that their good job will be created by their own creativity and the realization that they can own their own business.

Innovation itself doesn't create sales. The entrepreneur is the connector, the person who envisions a valuable product or concept and its customer, and then creates a business model and strategy that creates sales and profit.

Entrepreneurship is a long-term commitment that needs the support of the local community, local school district, coupled with state policy support. Clifton states, “If you were to ask me, from all of Gallup’s data and research on entrepreneurship, what will most likely tell you if you are winning or losing your city, my answer would be, ‘5th-12th-graders’ image of and relationship to free enterprise and entrepreneurship.’ If your city doesn't have growing economic energy in your 5th-12th-graders, you will experience neither job creation, nor city GDP growth.”

Entrepreneurship schools in our education system is a must and needs to be a supported strategy by leadership on all policy levels for our healthy, growing, successful future.

Create Wealth The Be WUCA! Way

The best way to lead a great team is to create an environment that encourages individuals to communicate better, deal with others better, and help people like and trust each other better. Effective leaders realize that the thin line between fitting in and being welcomed is so close to feeling excluded and left out.

Effective leaders know that people want to belong somewhere. In a group. At work. At the worship center. In families. With friends! If you know you can use some help in this leadership area in your relationships, you're in good company.

When effective leaders lead The Be WUCA! Way, wealth is created in many different forms.

What comes to mind when you think of creating wealth? A room full of gold? Vacations? A new car? Bills paid off so you feel wealthy? The newest phone or device? These certainly can be pictures of building or having wealth.

Much larger than the economic sense, creating wealth is the act of building a person’s knowledge, experience, and abilities to build sustainability in community. When you create wealth with The Be WUCA! Way foundation of leadership, you create opportunities for all people to belong, participate in, and contribute.

Frank Spillers

"Best training we have had in more than 13 years!"

When you create wealth The Be WUCA! Way, you change the way you look at things. You create wealth and healthy environments when you build people up, focus on making their lives better, and help others become what they dream about. You become a more effective leader when you encourage people The Be WUCA! Way, when you Welcome, Understand, Comfort, and Appreciate yourself and others. You will enjoy a sense of belonging!

Wealth creation begins with positive, forward-thinking, people-centered leadership making things happen! An effective leader will guide in identifying people’s passion and purpose because this is what really motivates us to perform, get things done, and do our very best work!

An effective leader will communicate a big-picture vision, assist to establish doable goals, and create an environment to achieve each and every one using and building people's talents along the way.

An effective leader allows - encourages - an individual to grow. When your words and actions build people, you will automatically strengthen businesses, create successful schools, excite communities, families, and organizations.

With effective leadership The Be WUCA! Way comes business and community growth because life will really be humming along and people will respond! Leaders set goals, always looking for and creating new pathways for people to engage. They generate new ways of seeing and acting on both persistent and emerging challenges that offer the possibility for change and authentic hope.

How do you rate your wealth creation? Do people feel they "belong" in your presence? Are you a good leader? Want to be a great leader?

Wherever you are in the world, your business, workplace, school, community, family, and organization will prosper when you put The Be WUCA! Way principles to work.

Learn to use them. Live them. You'll see a dramatic difference of wealth creation in your life! Step into being and creating leadership The Be WUCA! Way.

Be WUCA! Communities Create Civility for Young People!

At a time when many people feel overwhelmed by the problems and challenges facing children and adolescents, communities across the country need to discover new energy in working together, building civility toward a positive vision for young people. Instead of focusing only on problems of young people, communities need to build and support a foundation of development all young people need.

Uniting a community to nurture the positive development of youth and build civility is much like playing in a jazz ensemble. Each musician (community member) must know the tune and listen to the other ensemble members; all players must improvise together–sometimes taking the lead and sometimes blending into the background. To create a community-wide commitment to youth, all the “players” need to be an ensemble working toward a common vision of what is needed to promote the healthy development of young people.

Healthy Be WUCA! communities that build civility and family friendly supports need to act:

  • All residents take personal responsibility for the efforts to build civility in relationships.
  • The community thinks and acts intergenerational.
  • All children and teenagers frequently have opportunity to by in service to others.
  • Families are supported, educated, and equipped.
  • All children and teenagers receive support in both informal settings and in places where youth gather.
  • Neighborhoods and schools are places of caring, support, and safety.
  • Schools mobilize to promote caring, clear boundaries and sustained relationships with adults.
  • Businesses establish family-friendly policies for all employees.
  • Virtually all 10-to-18 year-olds are involved in one or more clubs, teams, or other youth-serving organizations that promote community building as a central part of their mission.
  • The media (print, radio, television) repeatedly communicate the community’s vision, support local mobilization efforts, and provide forums for sharing innovative actions taken by individuals and organizations.
  • Youth have opportunities to serve, lead, and make decisions in community government and service organizations.
  • Religious institutions mobilize their resources to build civility both within their own programs and in the community.
  • The community-wide commitment to building civility is long-term and sustained by business and industry and the public sector.

Communities utilizing Be WUCA! strategies will stem their population decline and attract new families. If you had a choice to live in a community that did not care about its youth or live in a community that engaged youth, into which community would you want to move your family? Think about it: all communities think they have great schools but I believe all parts of the community are needed to assist youth in education and to recognize as this is the place they wish to live or return with their families because of the importance that is placed on youth.

Habits Form Early. Living Them Is A Choice.

What do you do that reminds you of your parents? Do you ever remember saying, “I will never do this to my kids” or “I will never be like my mom or my dad!”

If you said those things, I want you to do something right now. 

Look around you. How you have decorated? Remind you of someone?

How about disciplining your kids? Remind you of someone?

Now go through the list and compare:

  • Work/Career
  • Where you live
  • Recreation
  • What you eat.
  • What time you eat
  • Hobbies
  • Social graces (or lack of)
  • Education
  • Cultural discrimination
  • Spirituality
  • Attitude about money
  • Spending habits
  • Appearance
  • Books/music/literature
  • Relationships

The habits of your parents or the people that raised you, make an impact on you whether you like it or not. It is neither good or bad unless you want it to be.

Some traditions are good. They provide an anchor and stability. However, traditions just for the sake of "we have always done it, but it has no meaning" are not good.

What you have to do is go through each of the habits and see where they are getting you. Is the habit getting you closer to your goals or is it creating a barrier between where you are and where you want to be?

You either do something and like it or you make up your mind to make a conscious decision to change what you are doing.

It is up to you. It is not your parent's fault, it is not your grandparent's fault. It is not the politician’s, or your spouse’s fault. Nor is your teacher to blame.

You are who you are because you chose to respond in certain ways.

Life happens because of our responses to events. We create our world.

Do you like yours? Take responsibility for who you are, where you are, and why you live the way you live.

Live what you like and change what you don’t. It is up to you.