Responsible Citizenship and Change

WUCA!-led communities are more open-minded, approachable, tend to have more newcomers, and they allow new people to make new ideas happen. Studies show U.S. state populations seeing growth have a higher percentage of newcomers than native-borns. A rural community that I once worked with told about a person who had moved to that community within the last two years. With three children enrolled in the district, she was at a school board meeting, and stood up to share her opinions on the issue at hand.

When she sat down, the lady next to her turned and told her that she had no right to talk at this meeting. The shocked woman asked why not. The woman replied that “she hadn’t lived here long enough.” Though she had children in the school, she'd only lived in the community a brief amount of time which, apparently, equaled her value and ability to contribute. In our town, we know people who moved to our community 30 years ago who still don’t feel they belong because their grandparents aren’t buried in the local cemetery.

As a leader, you need to look at your policies. Are they welcoming? As communities, counties, and states, do you allow newcomers to move in and do you embrace them? Yes, leaders love it when new companies come to town. There’s a ribbon-cutting for a new business,  a rousing welcome to all the new people to town, then, in a month, the excitement dies down and the new people that the community was excited about become  “those” new people with all those “strange” new ideas. Or sometimes you hear comments when they become successful, they must have done something “wrong” and “underhanded” to gain that accomplishment. Communities and people in general, have a habit of trying to pull successful people down to their level because there is a tendency to not like people who are doing better than they are because they have such low self-esteem.

Really, we often only like change if the change doesn’t affect us.

The result is that the future remains the same because people often refuse to take their role as responsible citizens to make change that is necessary. It’s hard work. It is messy. It requires talking to people. It requires acknowledging the world is not as black and white as we thought. Change requires slogging through the “gray” of an issue to see it through the eyes of another’s experience. Change requires that we may have to give up our way and do it someone else’s.

Remember that for every result that you want, there is a certain way of thinking, believing, and acting. You can change without improving, but you cannot improve without changing.

For your community, school, workplace, and organization to become "WUCA!-ized" contact kim@ghorizons.com

Frank and Kimberlee Spillers are the co-authors of "The Be WUCA! Way, The ART of getting along." Available at www.bewuca.com

 

Live and Work Your Passion

By Frank Spillers

When you started your career, you could feel the passion! Ready to take on the world and you knew that you were in the right place at the right time. Changing the status quo was your only agenda. Shaking it up and making the world a better place was a huge goal. Real passion - I’m equating it to a vigorous deep desire you feel within you that isn't easy to explain or define. This kind of passion propels you in a direction that seems motivated by a force beyond your control. It’s the inner excitement of being on the right path, doing what feels good to you, and what you know you were meant to do. It’s my contention that the mere presence of passion within you is all you need to fulfill your dreams.

Learn this innovative soft-skill technique working through our just-released popular book, The Be WUCA! Way, The ART of getting along.

 

When you’re enthusiastic, nothing seems difficult. When you have passion, there are no risks: family dramas become meaningless, money isn't an issue, you know that you have the strength and the smarts, and the rules laid down by others have no bearing on you whatsoever. That’s because you’re answering your calling—and the you who is doing the answering is the highest part of you, or the God within.

Visualize yourself working passionately at what you love. What would you be doing? What would you be feeling? Would you be doing it for free? Passion includes sharp focus, clear vision of your future, total control and mastery over your work, a healthy body and an exuberant attitude!

Are you doing those things? Are you living those feelings?

If you are not, you are not living your passion.

Many people would tell me that it is not feasible to live your passion. I can’t make money doing what I love. I don’t have the time to do what I am passionate about. I am too busy trying to make ends meet to really do what I am passionate about.

Does that sound like you?

I would say that you are just making excuses not to do what you love. Why?

Passion is God’s way of pushing you in the direction that He has prepared for you.

There is always a way to do something. Look around and list all the people doing what you would love to do. You tell yourself, “I wish I could do what they do!”

How do you think they do it? What do they do differently than you are doing?

Living your passion on a daily basis is what you were made to do.

Listen to your self-talk, your mind-chatter. Everything that you tell yourself, someone taught you to think.

Telling you that you can’t do what you want to do. You have to do "this" to make a living. You can’t really make a living on what you love to do - no one can. It is unrealistic to think that you can be happy working. No one is really happy at their job. It is just a way to make a living.

Sound familiar?

It doesn't have to be that way. There are people living their passion. I am one of them.

My passion is to create innovative ways that build people to be what they want to become - help them find their passion.

Life is too short to try and just get by. We listen to other people way too often. Other people do not have our best interest at heart. They usually talk from their experiences. They mean well sometimes, but they want to remain in their comfort zone and they want everyone else to stay there also.

Step out, find what you are passionate about, pray that a way will present itself, and then go for it. Find an accountability coach to help you and regain your life.

You will be a much better person for it and those who love you will appreciate the new you!

Passion does not come overnight. Taking these proactive steps will see a gradual increase in your enthusiasm. You will begin working with a newly-fired zeal which becomes contagious, motivating others as well. You will have consciously taken charge of your life and the fruits of prosperity will be in sight once again.

Find your passion and change your world!

 

 

Use a Different Set of Eyes

The new book, The Be WUCA! Way, The ART of getting along, uses grounded, research-based, take-charge "I can affect my future" techniques in an easy-to-understand format that will work. Using the exercises and ideas from its pages, you will change the way you look at things and, because you do, the things you look at will change. When you use a different set of eyes and create environments that create growth and productivity, you will live a Be WUCA! life.

A young boy, about seven, was racing his bike along a country road near his home.

As he approached an overpass, he braked hard, and came to a stop. There sat a huge truck with its trailer jammed tightly underneath the bridge.

Rescue vehicles, with lights flashing, blocked the only remaining open lane. A very large tow truck sat with engine idled, the driver puzzled at his repeated, failed attempts to dislodge the trailer.

Firefighters, policemen, truck driver, and several adult passersby gathered around the truck, all trying desperately to figure out how to free it from the bridge.

The young boy walked his bike up to the crowd. He caught the attention of a policeman. “What’s the matter, Officer?” he asked.

“The truck driver jammed his rig up under that bridge,” the patrol officer explained. “It’s stuck pretty tight. Tried several ways, but can’t seem to get it out.”

The young boy looked at the truck… then at the officer… and said matter-of-factly, “Why don’t they just let the air out of the tires?”

The officer was dumbfounded. He just shook his head, smiled at the boy, and said,

“Thanks kid!”

Have you ever looked for a way to solve a problem - maybe for days on end - turning it over and over to look at it different ways?

The successful way to solve any problem is to stop looking for the answer. When you relax and allow the problem to be solved, you find the solution that you never ever thought you would find and in a way that is all-of-a-sudden-obvious.

It's that way with your life. When you stop searching for the exact way that you think it should go and live your passion, a way will open to you. Live for today and tomorrow will open new doors that you did not see before.

Drive your CAR The WUCA! Way

Have you ever walked to your car and started it, expecting it to take you to your destination all by itself? Of course not. You need to drive it. You need to know beforehand where you are going.

What does this mean for your life? Your business? Your family? Your workplace?

Ladies and Gentlemen! Start Your Engines!

Let me introduce you to the new and improved model of "The WUCA! Car."

WUCA CAR

WUCA CAR

Stylish and sleek with integrity built in. Fully responsive to your actions. With bumper to bumper elegance that will passionately get you to your destination successfully with purpose.

When you drive your Be WUCA! CAR, the first thing you do is to think about the Result you want. Your destination. Where you want to end up. This step is nearly always within your power to determine. Many things you can think about ahead of time, so you have an automatic response - like your attitude getting out of bed in the morning. What kind of day do you want? Think ahead on this.

Identify your Circumstance. In whatever circumstance you are experiencing in life, what is happening to you? What are you thinking about related to a circumstance? Do you want to change anything about it? This has less certainty to it, as circumstances can change and are often beyond our control. But you often can still think ahead what may come your way.

What is completely within your control, however, is how you Act. Depending on what you've identified as your end result, you act on your circumstance to get the result you desire. You drive your CAR.

C = Circumstance

A= Action

R = Result

Just as if taking a trip, you map out the route that will get you where you want to end up in the amount of time you are planning.

Once you map out your route, you make sure that you have your car serviced. Do you have gas and oil? Are the fluid levels where they need to be? How is the tire pressure? All of these things should be checked before you start on your way.

In your life, is your mind serviced with the passion and training you need? Are the results you want within your purpose? If they are, then you are ready to drive your Be WUCA! CAR.

Just mapping out your trip and visualizing where you want to go does not get you there. You have to put your CAR into drive, step on the gas, and steer the CAR down the right road.

Will you run into road closures or road under construction sometimes?

Yes!

But when you do, there is always a way around it called a detour. (When one door closes, another one opens.)

Will your car need additional service; put gas in it?

Yes!

You will always need to stop for gas - additional training and get your rest.

Align your CAR and balance your tires - spend time with family, play, and develop friends.

And make time for tune-ups, like read books and articles, to make you a better person. Take additional training to help you reach your destination. Work with a Life Coach. Create a Mastermind group that will keep you on the road to success.

When you keep your foot on the gas and your Be WUCA! CAR is moving forward, you will reach your desired destination. You just have to:

Identify your Circumstances.

Act to map out your routes.

Choose where you will drive to get the Result you want to achieve success.

It is all up to you. You get to choose where you want to end up and what attitude you want while you are driving in your new WUCA! CAR.

BEEP!! BEEP!!!

Want to learn more? Schedule The Be WUCA! Way environmental specialist to show you how to improve your environment. You will learn The ART of getting along. kim@ghorizons.com  www.bewuca.com   http://goo.gl/UjF8L 

Be WUCA! for Schools - Coaching in the Classroom

Our experiences hiring high school and young adult workers chime in with the frustration of other business owners and heads of corporations: the quality of worker coming out of the high schools is not up to standard. Workers need to show up on time and be ready to work. They need to be able to get along and work well with others. There is often an air of entitlement with younger employees. They think that their mere presence is a gift to the business without hard work. So we took the requests for a stronger worker to the classroom to see if WUCA! would make a difference. Coaching in the Classroom (CIC) was created and began as a pilot project in 2009, focusing on 7th – 12th-graders in a rural Iowa school district and a metro alternative school, capitalizing on our more than 28 years’ expertise in rural business and economic development. CIC identifies student's passions, and uses positive self-talk and goal-setting utilized by championship athletes to develop championship students in the classroom.

CIC morphed after its first year in the rural district into a process that addresses students’ behaviors that put them “at-risk” of not graduating on time with their class, as defined by the Iowa Department of Education.

The Four Criteria

  1. Not being proficient in numeracy and literacy on Iowa Assessments;
  2. Failing at least one class;
  3. Not participating in any school activity; and
  4. Poor attendance and/or habitual tardiness.

If a student has a “check” in two of the four categories, they are considered “at-risk.” This designation doesn’t mean the child has substance abuse problems, any mental deficiencies, or other issues that could label them “at-risk.” It simply means that these behaviors are red flags – indicators that a student is developing habits that aren’t good for their academic and personal success in life.

Recognizing that these students will likely remain in their communities as employees and business owners after graduation, CIC connects these “at-risk” criteria to the behaviors employers require in employees that impact a workforce: show up on time. Be a lifelong learner and remember your lessons. Participate with others. Do “A”-quality work and turn it in on time.

The reality of our classrooms today is that our students are being taught core fundamentals, but our educational system, government mandates, and lack of solid parenting don’t allow time or staff to help them bridge the gap between school learning and applicability to the workforce once they leave school.

Coaching in the Classroom believes that all students will succeed when their passions, purpose, and goals align with their personal and occupational visions. CIC seeks to be the bridge that keeps all students in school through graduation and encourages self-motivation and drive for success in today’s global workforce.

CIC Goals

  • Improve scores of standardized assessments and other examinations.
  • Instill entrepreneurial spirit and skills to help students see the possibility of being local business owners and leaders.
  • Strengthen the local workforce by reinforcing the relevance of classroom instruction material to their futures.
  • Improve self-esteem of students when they achieve personal success raising scores and feel more hopeful about their future options.
  • Experience positive movement from students on youth surveys that measure students’ sense of security, belonging, and other less tangible but extremely important indicators for success.
  • Improve behavior of students in the community.
  • Improve relationships between students, staff, and faculty in school.
  • Improve relationships between the school, students, and the community.

Due to many factors, rural communities are being forced to look for new ways to sustain their towns and school districts. In this ever-evolving environment, the area workforce is changing from a blend of white- and blue-collar workers to a more dominant blue collar workforce, often resulting in more college-educated children choosing to look in metropolitan areas for work. The students who remain in their home area are more likely students for whom school was a more challenging and less satisfying experience.

These are the fine, bright people who, sooner or later, will likely become mayors and run the communities, city councils, school boards, churches, and civic organizations, owning businesses within the community.

In addition to in-class presentations, discussions, and field trips, CIC can specifically link students with businesses of interest to their identified passions. Communities, especially those in rural areas, need to aggressively integrate these students to pursue business succession and workforce improvement strategies in the area to increase population and school enrollment.

CIC includes real-life stories about roles and expectations as employees compared to how their employers view them. For example, students learn that tattoos, piercings, and texting on the job they feel are personal expressions and rights can affect their hirability and longevity at a business.

We set in place individual academic, extracurricular, and work-related steps to identify how to make life vision become reality. Sometimes this includes self-reflection and that is really, really tough for this population of students. Heck, most people don’t reflect because we often don’t like what we see, but it’s necessary for growth. It’s a valuable tool. So we include exercises that require them to glimpse into themselves and what they want. We encourage that they deserve what they dream. And that often requires changing their behaviors.

Involvement of the local businesses to strengthen the workforce can take place through relevant speakers to the classes, identifying gaps in businesses needed by the community, how students can look to fill the gaps, and understand how their high school learning will impact their future goals. It also takes the community to want to reach out to the students to welcome, engage, and recognize the talents they have to offer. Plus, community members need enthusiasm and patience to teach students the skills they need to learn.

In addition to all the activities and exercises included in CIC, we have encouraged students by

  • Telling them the criteria by which they have been measured since kindergarten. The mere knowledge of this “list” has been a revelation.
  • Telling them how to get off “the list” and that the ability to do so is completely within their power.
  • Helping them understand that their school attendance, classroom performance, attitude, and how they apply themselves at school matters to their ability to graduate and to future employment.
  • Ending every single class, and calling often through the halls, the single most important message from Coaching in the Classroom: make good choices. It hasn’t made us popular, but we’re known for it!

Results

  • Within months of CIC’s inception, students sent to the principal’s office for misbehavior was down more than 50 percent.
  • Students recognize that classroom work in core areas has direct impact on their future either in further education, enlisting in the military, or by remaining in or near their hometown and joining the workforce.
  • Student population considered “at-risk” has decreased from 41 to 12.3 percent.
  • The 2009 Freshman class set a goal for 100% of them to graduate on time and together. In 2013, they achieved the goal.

By identifying passions and aspirations with all students early in their school careers and helping them determine the steps to make their goals reality, students are more focused, better-behaved, and satisfied in high school, and better prepared whether they pursue a military career, go to college, or join the workforce upon graduation.