High Schools - Rural Community Job Creators

Growing our economy and saving our schools and communities can be done by creating high schools that teach young people they don’t have to work for a big company or for other people. Teach them that owning their own business is a possibility and, in fact, is a local strategy that will grow the economy. The best way to accelerate our job creation rate is to embrace and support policies in all levels of the political spectrum that create entrepreneurs. This is especially critical in today's job market, where change is taking place so rapidly, it's challenging to know what "jobs" will be available in the next three to five years. Especially in rural communities, business creation and succession are easier to determine and execute.

If we really want to make a difference in our economy and grow our towns, we must focus on entrepreneurship in our schools and towns. Don’t just create an entrepreneurship "class." Create a holistic entrepreneurship school that incorporates entrepreneurship practices into the core curriculum and an ecosystem in the community to support entrepreneurship.

We need:

  • to encourage people to dream.
  • to help talented individuals start companies that create business models that grow big-, medium-, small-sized, sustainable organizations.
  • to encourage students to create local jobs by owning local businesses.
  • to support them to grow regionally and globally.
  • entrepreneurship schools that give students alternative curriculum that teaches the components of business planning and use their youthful creativity to design the future.
  • holistic schools that engage youth to develop as local leaders, energizing them through entrepreneurship and business growth.
  • policies and new traditions that include youth in decision making for family-friendly communities.
  • to teach the importance of philanthropy and giving back locally.

Many of our towns are losing population. Schools are losing enrollment, and budgets are shrinking. We can turn around this trend by giving our youth an alternative to working for others and an alternative of having to move away to get a good job. That alternative is owning their own business and locating in the town where they are educated. 

Imagine a school in your town that incubates business ideas and business models that will spin out to locate on Main Street or can be run from a home using the community’s local technology, contributing to and growing your local tax base!

Do your students see a future for themselves?

Gallup identified the reason students drop out of school and disengage in education: they have lost all hope in graduating. They cannot see how the education they are getting will lead them to where they want to go. Students will engage in their education when they see how it will provide them with a good job and a chance for a good life. For many, it is giving them hope that their “good job” will be created by their own creativity and the realization that they can own their own business.

Innovation itself doesn’t create sales. The entrepreneur is the connector, the person who envisions a valuable product or concept and its customer, and then creates a business model and strategy that creates sales and profit.

This isn’t just a school’s issue. For many towns and cities, it is a community survival issue.

Entrepreneurship is a long-term commitment that needs the support of the local community, local school district, coupled with state policy support. From his book, The Coming Jobs War, Jim Clifton, chairman of Gallup, states, “If you were to ask me, from all of Gallup’s data and research on entrepreneurship, what will most likely tell you if you are winning or losing your city, my answer would be, ‘5th-12th-graders’ image of and relationship to free enterprise and entrepreneurship.’ If your city doesn’t have growing economic energy in your 5th-12th-graders, you will experience neither job creation, nor city GDP growth.”

 Entrepreneurship schools in our education system is a must and needs to be a supported strategy by leadership on all policy levels for our healthy, growing, successful future.

Who powers your town?

The dominant theme on any news is how “bad” big business is and how many employees “they” have added or taken away. Many people think that this country is run by “big business,” but actually, our country is really run and dominated by small- and medium-sized businesses. Ninety-eight percent of a community’s new jobs are created by businesses you see on your Main Street, home- based businesses that are a part of your town’s hidden economy, and many other of your existing businesses that you count on to meet your needs.

Clifton continues, “as of 2007, there were about six million businesses in the United States with at least one employee; businesses with 500 or fewer employees represent more than 99% of these six million. There are slightly more than 88,000 companies with 100 to 500 employees and about 18,000 with 500 to 10,000 workers – and only about 1,000 companies with more than 10,000 employees.”

Math says, of six million U.S. companies, only 107,000 of them have more than 100 employees. That leaves 5,893,000 businesses with fewer than 100 employees.

We work with communities on many different levels time in very rural areas. We’ve watched communities spend many thousands of dollars to “steal” companies from other towns, thus creating a neutral net gain of jobs in the economy. Many of those companies, after they have used up their tax advantages from relocating, will look elsewhere to gain more tax advantages and their loyalty to that community ends as soon as they receive a better deal, if there was any loyalty to begin with.

This is not just about taxes or regulations, though those are important components to the economy. Our focus is about teaching young people from a very early age that there is an alternative to working for someone else and that is creating your own business and products and working for yourself.

    According to Clifton, “the United States has successfully invented and commercialized between 30% and 40% of all breakthroughs worldwide, throughout virtually all categories, in the last 200+ years.”

    That is a startling statistic when you really think about what that means.  We have a culture of creativity and invention. We also have a culture of taking those inventions to market.

    That takes an entrepreneur.

    Who are your entrepreneurs?

    It appears to us we have been losing "entrepreneurial spirit" in our creative business cycle. Many community businesses are third-generation owners, passed down in families, leading to many of our communities and leaders losing their entrepreneurial culture, innovation, and drive.

    Entrepreneurs are the bridge to the innovations and those customers that will use the products, and the business model is everything! You can have all the inventions and innovative products in the world, but without the business model the entrepreneur creates to bring a product to market, new inventions and innovations sit on the shelf.

    Entrepreneurs are those who usually start businesses, but teaching entrepreneurship in school also introduces the concept of “intrapreneurship.” Intrapreneurs work inside companies and are the brains and energy behind creating customers.

    An entrepreneur/intrapreneur will create business models that will identify more customers and create innovative ways to address local, commercial, and social concerns.

    Who do YOU see has a great idea that can become a successful business for your community?

    If you'd like to explore ideas for your school and community, we're here!

    Stop the Drain - Stop Teaching Students to Work for Others

    Save our schools and communities. Grow our economy. What are we to do?

    The best way to accelerate our job creation rate is to embrace and support policies in all levels of the political spectrum that encourage entrepreneurs. We believe rural schools and communities can be saved and economies can grow by teaching young people they don’t have to work for a big company or for other people. Teach students that owning their own business is a great win-win strategy to grow the local economy! 

    This isn't just a school’s issue. For rural towns and cities, it's an issue of community survival.

    Our country is really run and dominated by small- and medium-sized businesses. Ninety-eight percent of your community’s new jobs are created by businesses you see on your Main Street, home- based businesses that are a part of your town’s hidden economy, and all your existing businesses you count on to meet your needs. Only 2% of all new jobs are created by companies recruited to your community.

    For more than 30 years, I have worked with communities on many different levels, much of that time in very rural areas. I've watched communities spend many thousands of dollars to “steal” companies from other towns, creating a neutral net gain of jobs in the economy. Many of those companies, after they have used up their tax advantages from relocating, will look elsewhere to gain more tax advantages and their loyalty to that community ends as soon as they receive a better deal.

    Our focus is teaching our young people from a very early age that an alternative of working for someone else is creating your own business and products.

    The bottom line is that if we really want to make a difference in our economy and grow our towns, we should focus on entrepreneurship in our schools. 

    Encourage people to dream and help talented individuals start companies that create business models that grow small-, medium-, big-sized, sustainable organizations. We need to encourage students to create local jobs by owning local businesses. And support them to grow regionally and globally.

    We need entrepreneurship schools that give students alternative curriculum that teaches the components of business planning and use their youthful creativity to design the future.

    Create curriculum that engages youth to develop as local leaders, energizes them through entrepreneurship and business growth, and teaches the importance of giving back through local charitable giving.

     We have a culture of taking inventions to market,. That takes an entrepreneur.

    It appears to me that we have been losing that part of our creative business cycle. Many community businesses are third-generation owners, passed down in families, leading to many of our communities and leaders losing their entrepreneurial culture, innovation, and drive.

    Entrepreneurs are those who usually start businesses, but another benefit of teaching entrepreneurship in school is teaching the concept of “intrapreneurship.” Intrapreneurs work inside companies and are the brains and energy behind creating customers.

    An entrepreneur/intrapreneur will create business models that will identify more customers and create innovative ways to address commercial and social concerns.

    Many of our towns are losing population. Schools are losing enrollment, and budgets are shrinking. We can turn around this trend by giving our youth an alternative to working for others and an alternative of having to move away to get a good job. That alternative is owning their own business and locating in the town where they are educated. Imagine a school in your town that incubates business ideas and business models that will spin out to locate on Main Street or can be run from a home using the community’s local technology, contributing to and growing your local tax base! You need to take responsibility in your community to create the environment for jobs to be created. Government can assist but cannot do it alone.

    Gallup identified the reason students drop out of school and disengage in education, they have lost all hope in graduating. They cannot see how the education they are getting will lead them to where they want to go. Students will engage in their education when they see how it will provide them with a good job and a chance for a good life. For many, it is giving them hope that their good job will be created by their own creativity and the realization that they can own their own business.

    Innovation itself doesn't create sales. The entrepreneur is the connector, the person who envisions a valuable product or concept and its customer, and then creates a business model and strategy that creates sales and profit.

    Entrepreneurship is a long-term commitment that needs the support of the local community, local school district, coupled with state policy support. Clifton states, “If you were to ask me, from all of Gallup’s data and research on entrepreneurship, what will most likely tell you if you are winning or losing your city, my answer would be, ‘5th-12th-graders’ image of and relationship to free enterprise and entrepreneurship.’ If your city doesn't have growing economic energy in your 5th-12th-graders, you will experience neither job creation, nor city GDP growth.”

    Entrepreneurship schools in our education system is a must and needs to be a supported strategy by leadership on all policy levels for our healthy, growing, successful future.

    Your Self-Talk Determines Your Health

    Your voice is the voice that you listen to the most. So stop and consider what you say to yourself. It will be the healthiest thing that you have ever done because you become what you think about. 

    What if, as a nation, we did not listen to the news? What if, as a nation, we did not listen to the so-called experts on the economy tell us how bad it is out there?

    I agree that we need knowledge of what is going on, but really, the repetition of how bad it is plays on the mind and has the power to make it "true."

    Look at all the businesses making record profits, but who are not hiring or expanding because of the information they are hearing. If the economy is so bad, why do they have record profits?

    It is that way with everything we think about.

    Do you always get a cold a certain time of year? Do you fulfill your own expectations?

    Before you try something, do you ever tell yourself that it is not going to turn out the way you wanted? What's your end result?

    It is no wonder that drug companies are making record profits. We are eating right out of their hands. Did you know that up to 60% of the most popular drugs sold today deal with emotional issues like depression, stress, and high blood pressure? Have you noticed that the ads for these are broadcast around the evening news? Do you think there is a coincidence?

    More and more people are dying of stress-related illnesses then ever before. Do you think that it is because 75% of the information that you hear in a day is negative? Most of the information you hear is coming into your belief system and you are accepting what is being said. When you believe what you hear, your body reacts in the way of your belief.

    We listen to the newscast and get depressed, and then watch the commercials from a drug company that says this drug will cure our depression.

    You need to combat your thoughts and protect your belief system. If you don't, you will likely go down the path well-traveled by many others, because if you always DO, what you've always DONE, you'll always GET, what you've always GOT!

    It is because of the way you think and the way you think about yourself and your well-being.

    Only one person can change your life and that person is you. You are accountable to you and accountable for your outcomes, but sometimes it's nice to have accountability partner.

    We help people get on the right path. Be WUCA!(c) Coaching is a way for you to feel right about what you are doing and get your body and mind in alignment. We use techniques that will help you develop the habits that you need to be successful in your career, education, and relationships.

    When you change your thinking, you change your life! Take a step forward today!